The Importance of Integrity in the IT Workplace

A recent article reveals that a staggering 88% of IT administrators would steal corporate secrets, passwords, customer databases, financial reports, etc. on their way out the door if they were ever laid off. One third of IT professionals also admitted in the survey to having snooped around on their company’s network and looked at confidential information including individual’s salaries and personal emails. A whopping one quarter of companies surveyed admitted being victims of internal sabotage and/or IT security fraud. IT professionals are integral to most companies today, and most all have the ability to commit these crimes. Character is a very important consideration when hiring anyone, even more so in the realm of IT.

Via Slashdot

Dropbox — Store and Sync Files Online

I signed up months ago as soon as I heard about the Dropbox beta, but it wasn’t until a few days ago that I received a private beta invitation in my inbox. Dropbox installs on your computer and points to a folder on your computer (named “My Dropbox” on Window’s machines) which it then ties to your online Dropbox account and server space. Anything you drop in that folder gets uploaded to your Dropbox online and you can then access the files by logging in to your Dropbox account online, getting public URLs for the files, or by using Dropbox on another machine you’ve allowed to sync to your account. It’s much like having a personal FTP site, but it’s easier to upload and download files since you have a nice web interface and don’t need an FTP program installed on each machine. Dropbox also allows you to create shared folders that you can invite friends to access. This could be very useful for collaborating on projects. Another handy feature is the log which keeps track of the changes made to your dropbox.

Users should be cautious about uploading sensitive and/or personal files. I wouldn’t recommend doing this in the first place, but if you must, be sure not to drop it in your public or shared folders. From the Dropbox website:

“While you own the content contained in Your Files, you hereby grant all other Dropbox users a non-exclusive, worldwide, royalty-free, sublicensable, perpetual and irrevocable right and license to use and exploit Your Files in your public folder. In addition, you hereby grant Dropbox users who have been given access to your shared folder a non-exclusive, worldwide, royalty-free, sublicensable, perpetual and irrevocable right and license to use and exploit Your Files in your shared folder. You represent and warrant that you own or have the necessary licenses, rights, consents and permissions to grant these licenses.”

I have a few beta invites left if you’re hankering to get your Dropbox on.

Firefox 3: Setting a World Record

The number isn’t official yet, but the world record is – Firefox is claiming 8,290,908 downloads in one 24-hour period. The idea of setting a world record (there isn’t one for this category yet) was a great marketing tool for the release of Firefox 3. The beta version of Firefox 3 was good and so is the full release version. I don’t have any gripes with it yet, but I am still waiting for all my extensions to be updated to work with the new version. If you didn’t help out with the world record achieving yesterday, you can still download Firefox 3.

Update: Delicious released an updated build compatible with Firefox 3 which integrates extremely well with Firefox’s built-in bookmarking system. There is also an unofficial update for the awesome Tab Mix Plus extension.

Via DownloadSquad

Get Naked, Promote Web Standards

Today is CSS Naked Day 2008, “a world-wide event that lasts for one international day (48 hours) where webmasters around the globe strip CSS from their websites to promote Web Standards with layered semantic markup, and a clear separation between content, and presentation to enhance accessibility” according to Dustin Diaz, the instigator of CSS Naked Day. If you’re reading this during the 48 hour event, you’re viewing my site without any formatting or glitz. If you’re reading this after CSS Naked Day there are other ways to see this page without CSS such as choosing View > Page Style > No Style in Firefox.

CSS stands for Cascading Style Sheets and these files contain code with all the formatting for sites. They tell the browser how all the tags and classes should display. Without style sheets developers would have to define each and every instance of a tag, so CSS saves a lot of time and effort and allows for a site to receive a face-lift easily by just replacing the CSS. To see some great examples of the power of CSS, check out csszengarden.com. Select a design from the list on the right side of the homepage to see how much a page can change when only the CSS changes.

Oh, and if you’re here to view my galleries, clicking on a thumbnail will load the image, it’s just way down the page for some reason. I didn’t have to time to fix the code, so I apologize in advance for any inconvenience.

Photoshop Express

Adobe has just launched a free, simplified online version of Photoshop for public beta. Besides simple things like croping, rotating, and removing red-eye, Photoshop Express offers more possibilities with adjustments for white balance, hue and saturation, and sharpening. They’ve even thrown in a few effects like black and white, sketch, and distort. Adobe has created a slick interface for users, keeping it simple with multiple scroll-over thumbnails showing what a certain change or effect will look like before it is applied. Users can also hide adjustments after they are made, just like layers in Photoshop. People unfamiliar with Photoshop will find Photoshop Express fun and useful, but experienced Photoshop users will also find this online version useful as a quick editor when away from their home computer and a place to store up to 2GB of photos after creating an account.

Check it out and create your free account.

Update: Photoshop Express will not support any image with a resolution larger than 4000 pixels on the longest side. Don’t worry about this unless you shoot with a camera that has more than 10 megapixels.

Copyright © 2007-2014 William Clayton